127 Comments

Nothing is better than the Anne of Green Gables books.

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Slow Horses by Mick Herron at the moment!

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The Expanse series by James S. A. Corey. Also (much older and totally different genre) the Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

The Lord of the Rings series. This year my project is to read the full narrative of Middle-earth by piecing together a chronology from the volumes outside the "core" of "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings." It took a while to construct the outline of what I wanted to read, separating narrative from commentary, and I've been reading a chapter or so a day. It's been a fantastic experience. The slow pace lets me appreciate the depth of Tokien's mythos in a way I never have before, and it's a pleasure to read a series that I first began reading as a child. A good series should endure for a lifetime!

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

I'm a huge fan of Louise Penny's Ganache series. Have read them all and always waiting for the next one!

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

There are three series that I've read in their entirety, and they're all very different from each other — and awesome.

Veronica Speedwell series by Deanna Raybourn: There are 8 books in this mystery-romance series so far; the 9th is coming out this spring. Veronica is a Victorian-era lepidopterist (butterfly hunter) with moxie and a very sharp hat pin. She and her (handsome) colleague Stoker get into all kinds of adventures. They're best read in order.

Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva: These are page-turning stories about found family masquerading as spy novels. The espionage stuff is GREAT, but the thing that keeps me coming back is Gabriel's team of friends and family. The relationships evolve over the the course of the books in really interesting ways — much like the Gamache series. Each book usually takes place in different cities around the world, so it's fun for armchair travel, too. I've re-read the whole series twice, and I don't think you need to read them in order — but it's rewarding if you do.

Inspector Lynley series by Elizabeth George: She's an American author but she writes VERY British mysteries mostly set in London, but sometimes heading out into the English countryside. Inspector Thomas Lynley is an Earl (!) — handsome, eloquent, well-mannered — but he's more interested in solving crimes and restoring justice than living a posh life. His work partner is Barbara Havers, a working-class woman with an enormous chip on her shoulder. This is another series where the crimes are very well constructed, and/but the characters are the reason to hang around. I've also re-read this series twice. These can definitely be read out of order — the latest is 'Something to Hide' and it's a fantastic look at race relations in modern London with a compelling, heart-rending crime. (But if you read them in order, it's like knowing these people over the course of decades, which I find very satisfying.)

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

I love, love, love, love, love the Thursday Murder Clib series.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

I'd say my top 3 lately have been:

Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan - it's a little overlong, but I really adore the characters and the worldbuilding. I like that Jordan lets the high fantasy descend into its realer consequences at times (Dumai's Wells, gunpowder weaponry) without getting too dark. And, unlike the other fantasy series I'm going to mention, I get an ending.

The Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell - Wellington's Peninsular War is such an interesting piece of history, and Sharpe is a great vehicle to explore this era. I especially love the section at the end of each book that explains what really happened vs. where Cornwell added the fictional touches.

A Song of Ice and Fire by George RR Martin - I love the ruthless logic in these books but I am getting impatient. There are so many great characters driving the plot in this world.

I used to read Reacher too, but at some point the journey to a destination I knew was coming stopped being worthwhile.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

Michael Connelly’s Bosch and Mickey Haller series.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

Gamache, of course.

Martin Walkers Chief Bruno

Jo Nesbos Harry Hole

Donna Leon set in Venice

Alexander McCall Smith’s Isabel Dalhousie.

Tana French.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

My adult self would say Elena Ferrante Neapolitan series. When I was way younger, I blazed through series.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

One of my friends recommended The Red Rising sage last year, I’ve now read the first 3 in the series and it is a good page-turning adventure to break up what I normally read about. It’s also one of those series that as I’ve read, I keep thinking “I can’t believe this isn’t a TV series yet” as the visuals and drama from the book seem perfect for an adaptation.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

The Cork O’Connor series by William Kent Krueger

I’ve read 9 (of nearly 20) so far and I just can’t stop. I actually tend to shy away from series because I like to read widely, but in this case I just can’t break away. Setting & Characters are both 10/10.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

Read all of the Anne of Green Gables series a few years back. Loved it and might revisit at some point.

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

I thoroughly enjoy the Dresden Files. Butcher does an excellent job of developing both the main character and the world overall as the series progresses!

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Jan 23Liked by Jeremy Anderberg

Master and Commander

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